If anybody is familiar with Malcolm Gladwell’s popular book Outliers, then you’re aware of his theory that in order to truly master anything, whether it be playing an instrument, mastering chess, or becoming a master chef, it takes approximately 10,000 hours of work to achieve this level of mastery, or virtuosity. One thing we all hope to take control of, if not master (who wants to exercise for 10,000 hours?), is our health and fitness. This all leads me to a conversation I had with a CFDR member a few weeks back. When discussing membership options she said that it probably didn’t matter if she came to class twice a week or three times a week. But it does matter.

To drive home the point, let’s say we have a CrossFitter who comes to class twice a week for 52 weeks out of the year, accounting for sickness, vacation, etc. That gives you 104 workouts in that one year block. Conversely, if that same CrossFitter comes to class three times a week in that same year, we’re looking at 156 workouts. That means that, essentially, by coming to class one more time a week, which isn’t a huge investment on a week by week basis, this CrossFitter has gotten 18 months of exercise in that same one year block.

If I asked you if you wanted to increase your fitness by a factor of 1.5, and all you had to do was give me one extra hour per week, that would probably seem like a pretty good deal. This is an example of how a small investment of your time and energy (because after all, it takes more than just showing up) can pay huge dividends over an extended period of time. Coming to class consistently and frequently will put you on the fast track to achieving your health and fitness goals, so come on in and let us help you get there.

How much difference does working out one extra day a week make? More than you think.

How much difference does working out one extra day a week make? More than you think.

We are open for 9:45am class.  Please be safe if you’re traveling.